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Why meditate on the Psalms – part 3

16 July 2013

EmotionsThis is the third post in a short series looking at the importance of the Psalms in the devotional life of the believer and in the worship life of a church. We are currently looking at the Psalms in our church so…why meditate on the Psalms?

(3)   They help us process our emotions

We have already touched on this, but the Psalms help two groups of people – those who are ruled by their emotions, and those that don’t know how to express emotion. When reading the Psalms one is immediately struck by the depth of emotion – whether in adoration, joy, celebration and worship of God (with dancing and tambourines); or deep despondency, depression, anger and sorrow (with weeping and dust and ashes)…and everything in between.

Some people are ruled by their emotions and their life is like a yo-yo (up and down…up and down), which not only affects them but affects all those who are close to them. The Psalms help these people express the raw reality of their emotion, but do it in such a way that is (a) real and genuine (b) godly and loving and (c) leads to hope and confidence. The Psalms provide grooves we can run down, well-worn grooves for all seasons of life; which take us from the reality of where we are and bring us to God and hope in him.

Other people, whether because of criticism and pressure from parents, school, culture or work (or something else) have suppressed their emotions; and though they feel things, they don’t know how to express what they feel and don’t know how to talk to God with such intimacy and love (or anger and frustration). The Psalms give these people grooves that enable them to connect deeper with God and with the church community.

So we should meditate on the Psalms to help us express our emotions in a godly and helpful way.

Part 4 tomorrow

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